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Posts Tagged → operating systems

How to build an 8 TB RAID5 encrypted time capsule for 500 Euros

So I wanted to buy a NAS that can act as a time capsule for Apple computers and run a proper Linux at the same time. I also wanted to be able to run the occasional Windows or Linux VM and I wanted to have a lot of storage. As I knew the thing was going to be in our coworking space, it also needed to have disk encryption.

Here’s how I built this for just under €500.00 using standard components and free open source software.

Selecting the hardware components

I found the HP ProLiant MicroServer (see Review and more Picures) to deliver great value for the price. At the time of writing, you can buy it for €209.90 if you’re in Germany like me.

The N36L (which I bought) comes with a single 250GB hard drive which obviously did not meet my “a lot of storage” requirement. So I bought 4 identical Seagate Barracuda Green 2000GB SATA drives which would add another €229.92 to the bill if you bought them today. I am not an expert in hard drives, but the Seagate Barracuda brand was familiar and “Green” sounds good as well.

If you don’t want your new server to host virtual machines at some point, you can probably get out your credit card and check out right now. If you’re like me though, you’d add another 2 bars of 4GB Kingston ValueRAM PC3-10667U CL9 (DDR3-1333) to your cart. The two of them together are just €44.24, so it’s no big deal anyways.

All components together will set you off €484.06. The rest is based on open source software (Debian mostly) which is free as in beer. More about that after the break.

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Where am I?

Recently I have been working for several clients where I had to test programs on different servers. The Unix prompt alone doesn’t always tell you which operating system you are logged on and – it gets worse – there seems to be no convention at all on where to store that information. Arun Singh from Novell has written a nice script to determine a Linux distro. However that script does not help you with other Unices and it isn’t installed on any server anyway. So as a note to myself here is a little collection of commands that help to find out the OS your shell is running on. A few further ideas are listed in this German linux forum.

cat /etc/issue*;
cat /etc/*-release;
cat /etc/*version;
lsb-release -a;
cat /proc/version;